Category Archives: Horse Drawn Equipment

Be Your Horse’s Leader and Partner

Do You Dream of being the Leader and Partner Your Horse Needs You to Be?

 Turn Your Dream into Reality:

attend a Doc Hammill Horsemanship Workshop

at Borderland Ranch in 2021

  Would you like to learn to

        • develop Trust, Respect, and Leadership in your relationship with your horse?
        •  feel safe, comfortable, and relaxed while interacting with your horse?
        •  understand what your horse’s behavior is telling you?
        •  understand what your body language is telling your horse?
        •  harness, hitch, and drive horses?

Working in an 'out-door classroom' at Therriault Creek Ranch, home of Doc Hammill Horsemanship

Spend a week in Beautiful NW Montana Learning Doc Hammill’s Horsemanship  “Fundamentals”

Come, join us for a very special time at our Montana ranch and acquire the horsemanship skills you have been wanting to achieve. Reserve your spot now! Contact Doc or call him at 406-250-8252 for workshop and reservation details.

Woman driving a team of horses hitched to a forecart on a gravel road
Vee driving Suffolk Punch mares on a forecart

Become one of Doc’s many successful students!

We are currently booking for our 2021 Montana Workshops; We would love to put your name on our list of successful participants.

Doc Hammill Horsemanship helps people to understand and build relationships with their horses. We believe that YOU are your horse’s best trainer; we teach you to gently, safely and effectively communicate and train your horse and to harness, hitch, drive, and work your horses. Through demonstrations, lectures, and hands-on exercises with Doc and Cathy’s personal horses, you will explore and practice the same techniques that Doc uses in workshops literally all across the US, to build partnerships with horses. You will learn and practice how to create this same kind of relationship with YOUR OWN horse(s).

Man coaching woman driving a team of Norwegian Fjord horses hitched to a horse drawn hay rake and raking hay
Doc working with Julia and ‘The Boys’ as they rake hay

Horse-Drawn Bale Moving Wagon

Horse-Drawn Bale Moving Wagon 1

We use our horse-drawn bale moving wagon regularly on the ranch to move bales!

We purchased the wagon as seen here. It was made by the seller, who assembled components to make a very useable and maneuverable wagon.

 It has Gehl running gear and is shortened to a 10-foot bed length. It has a new Pioneer Equipment bench seat and a new Pioneer cast toolbox is bolted on the bed, which was also new lumber when we purchased it. A modern bale spike assembly was mounted on the back, and when we purchased it, it had a high-capacity Warn winch (with remote operation !) mounted on it to run the bale lift mechanism. We replaced the battery-operated winch with a hand-operated come-along to lift the bales. Wedecided to use the winch on another piece of equipment where we could use the high capacity power. The hand operated come along works just fine, however, we’ve considered mounting a smaller battery operated winch to operate the lift mechanism. The wagon with a short wheel base is highly maneuverable which is incredibly helpful in our equipment yard, hay yard, and driveway accessing  our covered hay storage. 

Horse Drawn bale moving wagon 2

This side view shows the ‘bale spike’ mounted on the back. This component was purchased and added to the back of the flatbed wagon.

Horse-drawn bale wagon 3

The bale-spike is mounted on the long stringers that support the wagon bed. It is mounted to the stringers and pivots up and down between them, as shown in the photo below. The short spikes on either side of the long spike keep the bale from rotating -stabilizing it.

Horse-drawn bale wagon 4

We use a piece of plastic PVC pipe placed over the long spike to protect people and animals from the pointed spear when it is not being used to carry a bale. The PVC piece is just enough larger than the spike so that it comes off easily just before spearing the bale and goes back on the spike just after the bale is dropped. We always carry the PVC spike cover on the wagon when moving the bale so it can go back on the spike immediately after the bale is dropped.

Horse-drawn bale wagon5

The spike is set horizontally as the wagon is backed up to spear the bale.

Horse-drawn bale wagon 6

When purchased, the wagon had a large 12-volt battery-operated winch on it. We moved that winch to another piece of equipment and replaced it with a hand-operated come-along.

Horse-Drawn Bale Moving Wagon 1

Doc winches the bale up into a position that will hold it on the spike as he travels. In rough or irregular ground, we go slow, taking it easy so the bale doesn’t get to bouncing, giving special consideration to the horses, who would feel any bounding by the wagon and load.

Horse-drawn Bale moving wagon6

If you have questions or comments, please feel free to call

Doc 406-250-8252 or Contact Us, Cathy 406-890-3083